Heavy Duty Trucking

JUL 2014

The Fleet Business Authority

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28 HDT • JULY 2014 www.truckinginfo.com Regulations, Part 391, are the mini- mum standards. Many carriers find it beneficial to exceed these minimum standards and establish their own policy on qualifying applicants for driving positions. Some of a company's hiring stan- dards and minimum qualifications may include: • Minimum age and minimum years of verifiable commercial motor vehicle driving experience. • Only driver applicants with "x" number or fewer preventable acci- dents within the past "x" number of years will actually be considered for employment. • Only driver applicants with "x" number or fewer violations of mo- tor vehicle laws within the past "x" number of years will be considered for employment. • The company shall not consider for employment an applicant who has been convicted of any offense involving the operation of a commer- cial motor vehicle while impaired by alcohol or a controlled substance, or transporting a controlled substance. • The company shall not consider for employment a driver applicant who has been convicted of reckless driving of a motor vehicle within the past "x" years. • The company will seriously question the work history of a driver applicant who has held "x" number of motor carrier driving positions within the past "x" years. 3. The pre-employment screening program The PSP is a tool created by the FMCSA that makes crash records for the last five years and roadside inspection data for the last three years available to motor carriers conduct- ing a background check on a driver applicant. It is voluntary, but many motor carriers find it a valuable tool in hiring the best drivers. The PSP report will not show any conviction data. Instead, it will show a driver's involvement in all DOT-recordable accidents and any violations a driver has been cited for in a roadside inspection during those spans of time, regardless of the driver's employers. This will allow motor carriers to be better informed in their decision-making re- garding new hires, and also to increase safety on the highways by lessening the chances for historically unsafe drivers to operate commercial motor vehicles. Violations that prospective employers look for in the PSP report that are generally be- lieved to be a good indication of a driver's safety performance include pretrip inspection items, logbooks, and speeding. There is no "score" or "value" attached to the driver for the number of crashes or violations in the PSP. It only reports events. It is up to the carrier to decide if this driver applicant would make a good addition to the workforce. Your hiring efforts should be more successful if these three tools are used effectively — and quickly. If the driver is someone you want to hire, so does everyone else. Telling the applicant to "check back with us at the end of next week" because you cannot get something done quickly enough may give your competitor the time they need to hire the driver away from you. n Bob Rose is an editor, transport management, for J J. Keller & Associ- ates and has worked in the transporta- tion industry for over 25 years. He can be contacted at transporteditors@ jjkeller.com. Safety&Compliance Fleet SaFety ConFerenCe to Feature truCk traCk T his year's Fleet Safety Confer- ence, July 22-23 at the Renais- sance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel in Schaum- burg, Ill., will feature sessions aimed at heavy-duty truck fleets, such as what you don't know about truck inspections and an update on hours of service and electronic logs. More info at www.fleetsafetyconference.com Four-wheeler driving Flub s M ost truck drivers can share tales of unusual to downright dangerous things done by four- wheelers. A new non-scientific survey shows just how often peo- ple engage in some driving flubs. The poll of 2,000 licensed driv- ers by the auto insurance price comparison website Insurance. com found one-third admit they have gone the wrong way down a one-way street. The good news is this is lower than those who say they have driven over a curb in a parking lot (43%) or locked their keys in the car (37%), while more than half of drivers say they have forgotten where they parked. SAFETY Shorts Violations in the PSP report that are generally believed to be a good indication of a driver's safety performance include pretrip inspection items, logbooks, and speeding. ONE WAY

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