Heavy Duty Trucking

OCT 2014

The Fleet Business Authority

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Special Advertising Section The best and most consistent form of savings would have to come from the truck's powertrain. And it looks like that ball has started to roll. In an example of a new product that could prove a major breakthrough in the medium-duty market, Eaton has announced the Procision™ dual-clutch transmission (DCT). Stepping away from the torque-converter automatic transmissions so prevalently seen in the market, Eaton has decided that it's time to increase medium-duty truck MPG — straight from the factory. Delivering Value Eaton's Procision 7-speed DCT delivers 8-10% better fuel economy than a torque-converter automatic. Torque converter-style automatics result in more fuel loss because fuel is consumed during gear changes to recover lost momentum during torque interruptions. For a DCT, fuel no longer needs to be used during gear changes since one clutch is engaged at all times. The sidebar below gives a sample scenario of a f eet using a torque- converter automatic compared to using the Procision. Even assuming an 8% fuel economy increase, the sample f eet would save more than $12,000 annually in fuel spend. No telematics, no low-hanging fruit, no "batteries sold separately" — the fuel economy increase is part of the package. Applications best suited for the DCT are numerous, but it's initially being designed for the medium-duty market and start-and-stop duty cycles. This is where the Procision delivers the greatest value. The Eaton Procision 7-speed DCT is slated to be released in mid-2015. Gaining fuel eff ciency in medium- duty trucks, especially for those with frequent starts and stops, is typically minimal to unrealistic no matter what the method. For f eets that have implemented technology such as telematics, they are able to tackle low-hanging fruit and accomplish initiatives like idle reduction, improved driver behavior, route management, etc. that can all have a positive impact on MPG. But beyond these strategies, f eets are stuck with the truck product that's available — with an average medium-duty truck fuel eff ciency that's typically less than 10 MPG. If you have older trucks, you're probably looking at an even worse fuel economy than that. Adding to this, vocational trucks are used for very specif c applications, such as pickup and delivery with a lot of starts and stops. With these types of applications, many dynamics of the job are out of the f eet's control. And as much as f eets can use telematics to improve routing as much as possible, for example, in many cases, f eets are stuck with the routes they have, leaving them with few options to increase fuel eff ciency. That means the potential for savings with these new technologies can vary widely. It's Time to Increase Medium-Duty Truck MPG From pavement to tough terrain, medium-duty trucks tend to a range of f eet demands, but they also tend to eat away at the bottom line because of fuel costs. But why should that be the norm? ©2014 Eaton Corporation. All rights reserved. SQUEEZING OUT EVERY DROP OF DIESEL With the Eaton Procision dual-clutch transmission, f eets are looking at an 8-10% fuel economy increase over torque-converter automatics typical of medium-duty trucks. So even if we assume an 8% increase, what would that look like? Here's a sample scenario of a delivery-type f eet that you could try with your own numbers: FLEET USING TORQUE- FLEET USING EATON'S CONVERTER AUTOMATICS PROCISION DCT Fleet Size 10 Class-6 trucks 10 Class-6 trucks Average fuel economy 9.2 MPG* 9.94 MPG Average U.S. diesel price per gallon** $3.80 $3.80 Total miles annually per truck 40,000 40,000 Total annual fuel costs $165,217.39 $152,917.51 Annual fuel savings $12,299.88 * According to a 2012 J.D. Power & Associates study on 2011-MY Class 6 trucks. ** As of Sept. 15, 2014. Circle 143 on Reader Action Card

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